Welcome to the

   Trinity High School

  Athletic Training Website!

 


     Physicals are Required every Year!

The Hurst-Euless-Bedford ISD Athletic Department would like to thank you for taking the time to complete the UIL and HEB ISD required forms necessary for participation in athletics and cheer. All 7th through 12th grade athletes are required to complete the forms electronically online prior to each school year. You may access the online paperwork at: https://hebisd.rankonesport.com .

The only required document that cannot be completed online is the annual physical and medical history form. The physical and medical history form will be available to print during the online process. The completed physical form must be signed and dated by a physician and a parent no earlier than April 1st of the preceding school year and must be turned into your child’s coach before your child will be cleared to participate. It is recommended that you make a copy of the completed physical form for your files.

Please click the link above and proceed to the Instructions page to begin. Feel free to contact us or your coach if you have questions.

 

Thanks,

Trina Hughes, ATC John Brunett, ATC

trinahughes@hebisd.edu  johnbrunett@hebisd.edu

 



Nutrition Info

 

A routine change can make goals harder to achieve. Although it's easy to get off track when a season ends, a more difficult transition for many athletes is getting back into a season and allowing their nutrition to keep up with them.  Here are the biggest nutrition mistakes athletes make when transitioning into a competitive season.

Eating Unnecessary Calories

Although it is extremely important to make sure you are fueling properly for practices, games and races, sometimes the intensity of the season causes you to be more lenient with your food intake. For example, today I ran 10 miles in preparation for a half marathon, and I feel like it doesn't matter what I eat afterwards. Not true. I may need an extra snack or a larger portion at dinner, but I should not use my training as an excuse to overeat or to eat junk. Neither should you.

Not Bringing Snacks to Practice or Games

Since practice is usually scheduled immediately after school, it's important to remember to bring a snack to get you through. A small carbohydrate and protein snack pre-workout will allow you to have an excellent practice and feel better when you are finished.

Missing the Recovery Period

Just like the pre-workout snack can be helpful, the 45-minute window following a workout is key fueling time for proper recovery. Slacking on getting some nutrition then can lead to muscle soreness, fatigue and even injury. Make sure to have fuel with you for when you are done with your workout to help with muscle building and to replenish your energy stores.

Falling Short with Hydration

You need to stay hydrated not only during training or games, but also all day every day, especially in-season. Sometimes it can be difficult to double or triple your water intake, but start slow and work your way up.

Forgetting to Plan Meals

When you're in-season, your time is not always your own. Your schedule is filled with games, practices and team meetings. You need to take advantage of your free time to ensure healthy fueling during the week. Make sure to have pantry staples on hand, and do some kitchen prep on weekends to prepare for a healthy week!

Trying Different Methods of Fueling

Don't buy into the hype of athletic fuel marketing with various supplements, protein drinks, and energy gels. They will not make you a better athlete. Whole foods are your best fuel. Don't ever try something new without consulting with a health professional, and don't tamper with your fueling plan on game day or race day. Stick to what you know.

 

TIPS FOR GOOD NUTRITION FOR ATHLETES:

 

-   Eat 4 meals and 1-2 healthy snacks per day.  Include carbohydrates and protein items in each meal, adding in fruits and vegetables into 2-3 of your meals.

-   Portion sizes of each food item should be approximately the size of your fist.

-   Drink 1-2 gallons or more of water each day (depending on your body size).  Include light sports drink in between to add in your electrolytes.

- Take a daily multi-vitamin

-   EAT BREAKFAST!!! This in INDEED one of the most important meals of the day. This meal may also help you to loose weight. A bowl of cereal with sliced bananas is a great choice.

-   Eat and or drink something within the hour after your workout to help your muscles to recover from the stress you just put them through.  Example, chocolate milk and a peanut butter sandwich are great choices.

-   Choose foods that are good nutrition, such as items that are grilled or baked, not fried.

-   Choose foods enriched with whole grain, and calcium, such as whole grain cereal and orange juice with calcium.

-   If you are having continual muscle cramping, salt tablets can be added into your daily routine before your workouts.

-   Avoid caffeinated beverages (sodas, energy drinks, coffees, teas, etc).  These are diuretics and can cause you to become dehydrates.

 

BASIC LIST OF FOODS TO PICK FROM FOR YOUR DAILY MEALS:

PROTEINS:

Chicken breast

Turkey breast

Lean ground turkey

Swordfish

Salmon

Tuna

Crab

Lobster

Shrimp

Top round steak

Top sirloin steak

Lean ham

Egg whites on substitutes

Low-fat cottage cheese

Lean ground beef

Trout

Peanut butter

Milk

Yogurt

Beans

 

GOOD FATS:

Avocado

Sunflower seeds

Peanut putter

Low fat cheese

Low fat salad dressing

Olives and olive oil

Canola oil

Fish oil

Almonds

Peanuts

 

 

 

CARBOHYDRATES:

Baked potato

Sweet potato, Yams

Corn

Squash

Pumpkin

Steamed brown rice

Steamed white rice

Pasta (Whole Wheat)

Oatmeal

Bananas

Pineapple

Beans

Watermelon

Strawberries

Apples

Cantaloupe

Grapes

 Blue Berries

Oranges

Grapefruit

Fat-free yogurt

Whole wheat bread

Whole grain cereals/crackers

Bagels (Whole Wheat)

High fiber/Whole Grain Cereals

Pancakes

Popcorn (not buttered)

Wheat Tortillas

Granola

 

SALTY SNACKS:

(Good for salt intake in hot summer months)

Pretzels, Peanuts, Pickles

Reduced fat Chex Mix

 

VEGETABLES:

Broccoli

Asparagus

Lettuce

Carrots

Cauliflower

Green beans

Green peppers

Mushrooms

Spinach

Tomatoes

Peas

Brussels sprouts

Artichokes

Celery

Zucchini

Cucumbers

Onions

Pickles

Corn

Squash

 

FATS TO AVOID:

Butter

Fried foods

Regular Mayonnaise

Sweets

Whole-fat daily products

Sodas

Creamy salad dressings